Why You Should Suck Up Your Temper at Work

Posted on
Share on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Most of us work hard to maintain our professionalism at work. Not only because it eases working relationships and makes work more pleasant, but because it’s just the right thing to do. We spend most of our waking hours working these days, and who wants to work with brats who kick and clown and otherwise show out inappropriately in the office? It’s one of those unwritten codes – thou shalt not act ridiculous and stomp around like a toddler taking out your toy angst on everyone in sight.

 

However, sometimes things happen. Usually it’s something small that will later seem ridiculous, but later is often too late to repair the damage to your work relationships if you lose control. “But, it wasn’t my fault!” you cry. “I was a victim!” It doesn’t matter. Sometimes things aren’t your fault. You still want to take a deep breath in that highly charged moment before you open your trap and who-knows-what rolls out. It’s far better to have a reputation for being cool under pressure than volcanic or heated under fire. “But s/he did this, and that’s not right! How can I…” and you sigh dramatically, shaking your head in confusion.

 

Right or wrong, it’s difficult when thrust into an uncomfortable situation or confrontation to conduct an on-the-spot assessment of whether or not it’s worth it to defend yourself. Should you bother with it, or take the path of least resistance? Choose the latter. The momentary gratification of letting your tongue run away with you carries a sharp tax. Mud sticks. And if you throw any, don’t be surprised if you’re the one who is later tarred and feathered by a bad or inconvenient reputation, like the company whiner, (aka, the big office baby). Before you blow up or indulge in a little five-minute explosion, figure out if the juice is worth the squeeze. Nine times out of 10, it isn’t, so be cool.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
cmadmin

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Posted in Archive|

Comment:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>