WANTED Technologies Ranks Cities Where Hiring Demand is Highest Compared to the Available Supply of Workers

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<p><strong>New York &mdash; July 6 </strong><br /><br />If you are a physical therapist assistant, finding a job should be easier in Seattle. If you are a computer systems analyst looking for work, Dayton, Ohio, is the place for you. A landscaper? Try Killeen, Texas.<br /> <br />Employers advertise more than 3 million jobs each week, but locations with a demand for jobs are not always locations with a supply of qualified workers. This localized mismatch &mdash; more jobs and not enough workers, or more workers and not enough jobs &mdash; is one of the many reasons U.S. unemployment is predicted to reach 10 percent in the coming months.<br /> <br />WANTED Technologies has calculated the gap between local demand for workers and supply of workers and identified cities where the demand exceeds supply by the greatest margin. WANTED&rsquo;s Supply/Demand Ratios calculate this gap for each occupation and metro area in the United States and map the results at http://hdi.wantedanalytics.com/supply-demand-ratios/.<br /> <br />&ldquo;The best place to look for work is not always where you find the most positions advertised,&rdquo; said Bruce Murray, CEO of WANTED Technologies. &ldquo;The best place to look for work is where there are many jobs advertised and also where there are very few qualified applicants.&rdquo;<br /> <br />Each month, WANTED summarizes all the job ads for each occupation that appear on online job boards and compares that to the number of employees in each occupation and city, as estimated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The difference between the demand and supply in each occupation and city is compared to the national average for that occupation. Cities where the mix of demand and supply exceed the national average are good bets for people looking for work. </p>

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