TalentDrive’s 5 Tips for Finding the “Purple Squirrel”

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<strong>Chicago &mdash; Nov. 8</strong><br />TalentDrive, an innovative online resume sourcing company, is helping companies find elusive job candidates (i.e., purple squirrels) more efficiently and quickly.<br /><br />&ldquo;TalentDrive has cracked the code for sourcing resumes for specialized positions,&rdquo; said Sean Bisceglia, chief executive officer of TalentDrive. &ldquo;Our online sourcing technology allows us to find the needle in the haystack, so to speak.&rdquo;<br /><br />Since TalentDrive launched in June of this year, it has provided resume sourcing services to more than 25 global companies, helping to fill more than 300 different job openings.<br /><br />TalentDrive&rsquo;s Top Five Tips for Online Resume Sourcing Success:<br /><br />1. Don&rsquo;t put all your eggs in one basket. Look beyond the big job boards. Today&rsquo;s job hunters are using the Internet to diversify their approach to getting employed and are turning to niche job boards, local community Web sites, social networking sites, university Web sites, etc., all at the same time. TalentDrive is the first company with the capability to sweep resumes from more than 40,000 Web-based locations.<br /><br />2. Look out for false-positives. There are many ways to trick the system. For example, some job hunters insert keywords that can&#39;t be seen by the naked eye in order to get a higher resume ranking. Others might include a phony typed note in a different font at the top of their documents to give the false impression to a hiring manager that an insider at the company already gave the applicant&#39;s resume his or her approval. TalentDrive is the first company with the capability to pull resumes from more than 40,000 Web-based locations combined with experienced industry analysts who provide objective, eyes-on review of resumes to eliminate any false-positives.<br /><br />3. Develop deep DNA search strings. It&rsquo;s important to try variations of search strings that widen or narrow results until you hit the magic sweet spot. TalentDrive&rsquo;s sourcing strategists are experts in creating customized Boolean search strings that equip TalentDrive&rsquo;s search optimization technology with the specific information needed to pull qualified resumes.<br /><br />4. Think &ldquo;LIFO&rdquo; &mdash; every day in, every day out. Find a way to search online locations every minute of the day. TalentDrive&rsquo;s resume sourcing technology sweeps the Web 24 hours a day to pull in the most qualified resumes.<br /><br />5. Think like a hiring manager. It&rsquo;s important to have the technology that can quickly and efficiently retrieve resumes from the Web. But it&rsquo;s just as important to have someone cut through the clutter. TalentDrive&rsquo;s industry analysts have more than 10 years of industry experience within sales, manufacturing and distribution, information technology, finance and accounting, and R&D and engineering. They bring to the table a hiring manager&#39;s point of view that can be invaluable for recruiters.<br /><br />The Internet is touted as one of the most effective methods recruiters now have for acquiring top talent. However, sourcing resumes from online locations and sifting through piles of unqualified resumes can be very time consuming and overwhelming. TalentDrive follows the top five tips through its combination of technology and industry analysts to provide companies with a strategic sourcing service that delivers quality talent more efficiently.<br />

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