Senior Execs Most Satisfied With Innovation

Posted on
Like what you see? Share it.Share on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

<strong>Purchase, N.Y. &mdash; March 28</strong> <br />Senior-level executives are the most satisfied with their companies&rsquo; innovation in products and technology, while professional employees &mdash; such as engineers and programmers &mdash; are the least satisfied, according to a study by Sirota Survey Intelligence, specialists in attitude research.<br /><br />Employees working for communications, utility and transportation companies are the most satisfied with their employers&rsquo; innovations in products and technology, while employees of high-tech companies are the least satisfied, according to the Sirota Survey Intelligence study of 81 companies.<br /><br />Employees&rsquo; satisfaction with their employers&rsquo; innovation, according to their management levels, was:<br /><br /><ul><li><strong>Senior-level executives:</strong> &ndash; 74 percent of these employees are satisfied with their company&rsquo;s innovation in products and technology.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Lower-level managers: </strong>70 percent are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Nonprofessional, nonmanagement employees</strong>:&nbsp; 70 percent are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Midlevel managers: </strong>69 percent are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Professional employees:</strong> 62 percent are satisfied.</li></ul>&ldquo;While the satisfaction of lower- and midlevel managers with the innovation of their companies falls somewhere in the middle, professional employees are clearly the least satisfied,&quot; said Douglas Klein, Sirota Survey Intelligence president. &quot;This may be a cause for concern, since professionals are the ones most responsible for the development of new ideas that lead to practical product and service innovations.&nbsp; <br /><br />&ldquo;The much-higher satisfaction of senior managers with their companies&rsquo; innovation than that expressed by professional employees may be signaling the need for a more in-depth dialogue between these two groups about what is truly in the innovation pipeline and what barriers professionals believe are standing in the way.&quot; <br /><br />Employees&rsquo; satisfaction with their employers&rsquo; innovation, according to their industries, was:<br /><ul><li><strong>Communication/transportation/utilities: </strong>82 percent of employees are satisfied with their company&rsquo;s innovation in products and technology.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Financial services:</strong> 76 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Insurance: </strong>75 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Retail:</strong> 73 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Services:</strong> 68 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Manufacturing:</strong> 64 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>High technology: </strong>52 percent of employees are satisfied.</li></ul><p>&ldquo;The fact that high-tech employees are the least satisfied of any industry group with their companies&rsquo; innovation may not be too surprising &mdash; or even a bad sign,&rdquo; Klein said. &ldquo;High-tech employees are probably the most focused on, most sensitive to, and therefore, the most critical about advances in innovation. The threshold for their satisfaction may be much higher. <br /><br />&ldquo;The manufacturing sector (especially the professional segment) is very much like high-technology &mdash; it&rsquo;s tough to innovate in both high-tech and manufacturing partly because it calls for technological/engineering changes that require a lot of capital. Among nonmanagement, nonprofessional employees at manufacturing companies, innovation can be hard to do in their environments unless they are given freedom, as they are at a few companies like Mercedes. But unfortunately, these companies are the exception rather than the rule.&rdquo;<br /><br />What should companies that want to create a better climate for innovation do?&nbsp; In addition to having the full sponsorship and support of their senior management, they should focus more on:</p><ul><li>Clear and appropriate goals.</li><li>Team selection and balance.</li><li>Diverse teams.</li><li>Greater familiarity with their markets.</li><li>A flexible organizational structure.</li><li>Flexible controls and measurements.</li><li>Appropriate employee incentives.</li><li>Realistic deadlines that are best suited to the challenge of true innovation.</li></ul>

Like what you see? Share it.Share on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
cmadmin

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Posted in Archive|

Comment: