Survey: HR Professionals Working Longer Hours

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<p><strong>London &mdash; Sept. 25</strong><br />More HR professionals are working longer hours than ever, according to the latest reward survey of more than 6,000 HR professionals from Croner Reward in association with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). </p><p>The survey reveals 79 percent of HR professionals have contracted hours of between 35 and 37 hours but only 29 percent actually work these hours, compared with 45 percent surveyed in 2005. </p><p>Fifty-six per cent of respondents are now working 40 to 45 hours, a 20 percent increase over the past two years.<br /><br />&ldquo;The long-hours culture could reflect the fact that HR departments are under increasing pressure to demonstrate how they add value to the business,” said Charles Cotton, CIPD adviser. “Recent CIPD research shows that 80 percent of organizations have restructured their HR function in the past five years in a quest to become more strategic.&rdquo;</p><p>The report, “Personnel Rewards,” reveals:<br /></p><ul><li>More than 60 percent of HR professionals working in the private sector tend to work more hours, between 40 and 50 hours a week, compared with 51 percent in 2005.</li><li>More than 50 percent of HR professionals working in the voluntary sector tend to work more hours, between 40 and 50 hours a week, compared with 27 percent in 2005.</li><li>46 percent of HR professionals working in the public sector tend to work more hours, between 40 and 50 hours a week, compared with 37 percent in 2005.</li></ul><p>Despite the number of HR professionals working longer hours increasing, 64 percent of them rate their job satisfaction as good or excellent. </p><p>Those working in the public sector experience the lowest job satisfaction (55 percent), compared with 73 percent in the nonprofit sector.</p><p>&ldquo;Fewer HR professionals in the public sector work long hours than those in the private or not for profit sector, yet public sector workers have the lowest levels of job satisfaction,” Cotton said. “It&rsquo;s clear to see that long hours culture isn&rsquo;t the only factor that affects the well-being of employees. Our survey shows that one of the main reasons HR professionals working in the public sector experience low levels of job satisfaction is due to bad management but low levels in other sectors is largely due to lack of recognition and job security.&rdquo;<br /><br />Vivienne Copeland, Croner Reward director of client services, agrees. </p><p>&ldquo;The results show that senior HR professionals are working longer hours than ever, with 82 percent of HR directors and 36 percent of HR administrators working more than 40 hours a week,” Copeland said. “So, while HR professionals are trying to encourage work-life balance among the workforce, it appears they might struggle to achieve this for themselves.&rdquo;</p>

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