Students Expect To Remain With First Employer

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<strong>Philadelphia &mdash; Sept. 27</strong><br />Most college students expect to stay with their first employers for less than three years, with the pace of their job-changing slowing down after their initial employment, according to the College Student Career Confidence Survey by Right Management, a wholly owned subsidiary of Manpower Inc.<br /><br />According to the Right Management survey of 247 recent college graduates and college students throughout the United States:<br /><br /><ul><li>61 percent of college students expect to remain with their first employers for less than three years.</li></ul><br /><ul><li>Only 16 percent anticipate continuing to change jobs as quickly throughout their careers.</li></ul><ul><li>34 percent said they plan to change jobs every three to four years, and 50 percent expect to switch employers every five years or more.</li></ul>The top factors most important to college graduates when considering which employers to work for are:<br /><br /><ul><li>Opportunities for career development</li><li>Work-life balance</li><li>Good rapport with bosses and co-workers</li><li>Employers valuing their opinions</li><li>Receiving positive feedback for a job well-done</li><li>Getting information in a timely manner</li></ul>&ldquo;Understanding what motivates recent graduates is important if you want to keep them in your organization for more than three years,&rdquo; said Douglas J. Matthews, Righ Management president and chief operating officer. &ldquo;Career development opportunities are one of the top motivators. Giving them a chance to develop professionally and advance in their careers will foster higher levels of engagement, productivity and retention.<br /><br />&ldquo;And, according to Right Management&rsquo;s research, it costs an average of 2.5 times an individual&rsquo;s salary to replace an employee in recruitment, training, lost productivity and severance costs. So, it pays to help get new hires committed to their jobs and organizations, and keep them fully engaged in their jobs, as early in their careers as possible.&rdquo;

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