Training Professionals Earning Higher HR salary

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<strong>London &mdash; Oct. 18</strong><br />For the first time in 10 years, learning, training and development professionals are earning higher than the average HR salary, according to the latest reward survey from Croner Reward in association with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). <br /><br />Charles Cotton, CIPD reward adviser, said he thinks this is a reflection of the growing challenges organizations face in overcoming skills shortages.<br /><br />Managers in the learning and development field earn an average of £45,000 (up 4 percent), compared with £37,739 last year (down 2.4 percent). <br /><br />They have moved up the ranks from the lowest-paid specialists in the HR industry to become second-highest paid specialists in the HR industry, alongside recruitment specialists and employee relations.<br /><br />&ldquo;Skills shortages and the need for continuous change within organizations are forcing employers to increasingly recognize the strategic importance of learning and development,” Cotton said. “This is being reflected in the increased salaries that many learning, training and development specialists now receive. The survey shows that learning, training and development professionals are currently the shock troops in the war for talent and the search for sustainable high performance working.<br /><br />”CIPD research shows many organizations are now using learning and development to allow internal staff to fill posts and appointing people who have the potential to grow but who currently don&rsquo;t have all that&rsquo;s required in response to these problems. But for this to work effectively, learning, training and development professionals need to be sufficiently rewarded.”<br /><br />Compensation and benefits specialists are the highest-paid specialitization, receiving as much as 16 percent above the average salary for a senior manager (£50,000 compared with £43,272).<br /><br />”The pay reflects the challenges that reward specialists face in providing a competitive pay and benefit package to help recruit, retain and motivate talent in a difficult labor market while keeping wage costs down,” Cotton said. “It is up to the reward specialist to design a package that not only includes a good remuneration package but other elements such as holiday entitlement, flexible working, pension and health insurance.”<br /><br />Recruitment managers and employee relations managers earn an average of £45,000 (up 4 percent), and personnel professionals working as internal consultants on projects earn £48,750, 13 percent above the average HR salary. The lowest-paid specializaition this year is health and safety.<br /><br />&ldquo;Overall engagement levels among HR professionals are quite high, but this drops dramatically for health and safety professionals,” Cotton said. “Despite being the lowest paid in the profession, 43 percent of health and safety professionals say that their pay is about right, which suggests there are other issues affecting their levels of job satisfaction.&rdquo;<br /><br />Vivienne Copeland, director of client services at Croner Reward, agrees.<br /><br />&ldquo;Our survey shows that one of the main reasons HR professionals working in the public sector experience low levels of engagement is due to bad management but low levels of satisfaction in other sectors is largely due to lack of recognition and job security,&rdquo; she said.<br /><br /><ul><li>64 percent of training specialists report excellent or good levels of job satisfaction.</li><li>63 percent of reward specialists report excellent or good levels of job satisfaction.</li><li>56 percent of recruitment specialists report excellent or good levels of job satisfaction.</li><li>53 percent of employee relations specialists report excellent or good levels of job satisfaction.</li><li>29 percent of health and safety specialists report excellent or good levels of job satisfaction.</li></ul>

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