Salary Survey Extra: Most common non-monetary compensation

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Salary Survey Extra is a series of dispatches that give added insight into the findings of our annual Salary Survey. These posts contain previously unpublished Salary Survey data.

Every worker gets a paycheck. And every worker benefits from some form(s) of non-monetary compensation.As every worker knows, the amount of money that goes into your bank account following the close of each pay period may be the most visible element of your total compensation, but it’s far from being the entire package. Almost every worker in the world benefits from various types of non-monetary compensation.

Most commonly called “benefits,” non-monetary compensation in its various forms addresses everything from retirement planning and vacations to healthcare and public transportation. If you ever look at the number on your paycheck and feel that it’s maybe not as large as you’d like, it can be helpful to consider everything else that your employer is already shelling out to keep you around.

We asked a couple of questions about non-monetary compensation in our most recent Salary Survey, and today we’re taking a look at some of those results. More specifically, what are the most common forms or non-monetary compensation, both among certified IT professionals in United States, and among certified IT professionals in other nations?

ALL U.S. WORKERS
Type of Benefit — Percentage of workers who receive this benefit
Medical insurance — 95.4 percent
Paid time off (PTO) — 93.4 percent
Dental insurance — 92.1 percent
401(k) — 87.9 percent
Vision insurance — 87.5 percent
Sick time — 69.1 percent
Training or certification assistance — 67.7 percent
Flexible scheduling — 61.3 percent
Bonus or incentive programs — 56.5 percent
Tuition assistance — 53.7 percent
Pension or other retirement fund —  32.7 percent
Parking and transit assistance — 26.1 percent
Stock options — 24.4 percent
Child care — 17.3 percent

ALL NON-U.S. WORKERS
Type of Benefit — Percentage of workers who receive this benefit
Medical insurance — 69.3 percent
Sick time — 60.4 percent
Training or certification assistance — 58.5 percent
Paid time off (PTO) — 52.3 percent
Bonus or incentive programs — 50.2 percent
Pension or other retirement fund — 45.4 percent
Flexible scheduling — 39.7 percent
Dental insurance — 28.5 percent
Parking and transit assistance — 20.5 percent
Stock options — 19.6 percent
Vision insurance — 18.8 percent
Child care — 15.4 percent
Tuition assistance — 11.2 percent
401(k) — N/A

One big takeaway from this comparison? Stop your dang whining, U.S. workers. Almost every last one of you gets medical insurance, paid vacation, and dental insurance from your employer. Look at the overall trend outside the United States and be happy with what you’ve got. Insurance, on the other hand, is not such a (literally) life-or-death proposition in countries that provide healthcare to all citizens, so there’s that.

It’s interesting to not how few workers in both regions get stock options as an element of compensation. Once upon a time during the tech boom, stock options were as commonplace as the company 401(k). Not anymore. And, well, if you have kids, figuring out what to do with while you’re at work is on you, no matter where you live. Employers everywhere, it would seem, got no truck with childcare assistance.

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CertMag Staff

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Certification Magazine was launched in 1999 and remained in print until mid-2008. Publication was restarted on a quarterly basis in February 2014. Subscribe to CertMag here.

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