Salary Survey Extra: Do certified IT pros have college degrees?

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Salary Survey Extra is a series of dispatches that give added insight into the findings of our annual Salary Survey. These posts contain previously unpublished Salary Survey data.

You don't have to have a college degree to work in IT. But how many certified IT workers do?It’s a verifiable fact that not everyone who works in the IT realm, whether directly for a technology company or as IT staff somewhere outside the tech business world, has a college or university degree. Observers sometimes extrapolate that to mean that one doesn’t really need a college or university degree to forge a successful IT career.

Whether an individual IT worker has a college degree, of course, is an entirely separate conversation from whether an individual IT worker needs a college degree to succeed. We can’t make a case for or against needing a degree to succeed in IT, or at least we can’t really do that using data from the Salary Survey. The best we could do is suggest some correlations.

On the other hand, we can absolutely talk about how many of the certified IT professionals who participated in the survey have some level of college degree attainment in their educational background. That’s just talking about numbers.

One thing the numbers tell us is that, among survey respondents, 82.3 percent of individuals who have at least one current IT certification, work full-time, and live in the United States, have also completed some level of college degree: associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, doctorate, or professional degree (such as in law or medicine).

That leaves just a bit fewer than 18 percent of individuals who meet those same criteria — at least one current cert, full-time job, live in the United States — who never completed any level of degree, even if they spent some time at a college or university. (Which they probably did. Even Mark Zuckerberg, for example, was actually a student at Harvard before dropping out to start Facebook.)

We don’t ask for a complete educational history in the survey, so we can’t say exactly who holds which kind(s) of degrees. We do ask each participant to report the highest level of education they’ve completed. So to break it down on that level, among U.S. respondents employed full-time who have at least one current IT certification, here’s what we know:

Level of Educational Attainment — Percentage of Full-Time, IT Certified U.S. Workers at This Level
Professional Degree — 0.8 percent
Doctorate — 1.6 percent
Master’s Degree — 29.3 percent
Bachelor’s Degree — 40 percent
Associate’s Degree — 10.5 percent
Technical Training (No college degree) — 10.4 percent
High School Diploma — 4.4 percent
Currently in school — 2.8 percent
No formal education before entering the workforce — 0.1 percent

Here’s what we get if we put non-U.S. professionals who participated in the survey under the same lens:

Level of Educational Attainment — Percentage of Full-Time, IT Certified non-U.S. Workers at This Level
Professional Degree — 3 percent
Doctorate — 1.5 percent
Master’s Degree — 38.4 percent
Bachelor’s Degree — 41.3 percent
Associate’s Degree — 4.5 percent
Technical Training (No college degree) — 5.2 percent
High School Diploma — 5.4 percent
Currently in school — 0.3 percent
No formal education before entering the workforce — 0.4 percent

So that’s 88.7 percent of on non-U.S. certified IT pros with full-time jobs who completed some level of college degree.

It’s abundantly clear from those numbers that certified IT professionals with no college degree of any kind can and do successfully get full-time jobs. On the other hand, far, far more of our 2019 Salary Survey participants (more than 4,700 certified IT professionals in all) have degrees than do not have them. Which says something.

Related: Salary Survey Extra: The impact on income of formal education (Jan. 10)

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CertMag Staff

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Certification Magazine was launched in 1999 and remained in print until mid-2008. Publication was restarted on a quarterly basis in February 2014. Subscribe to CertMag here.

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