Question 3: Solaris 10 OS, Part I

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Objective:

Perform User and Security Administration
SubObjective:

Monitor system access by using appropriate commands

Multiple Answer, Multiple Choice

A process on the system suddenly stopped responding causing inconvenience to users. You use the /usr/bin/ps -eflL command to check the commands that might be running on the system and causing the problem. Which three commands can be the cause of the problem? (Choose three.)

A.

df
B. pmap
C.

pflags
D.pfiles
E. pstack

Answer:
C. pflags
D. pfiles
E. pstack

Tutorial:
Running the pflags, pfiles or pstack command on a target process can cause the process to stop responding. When these commands are run they inspect the target process and report certain results related to the process. While inspecting, these commands stop the target process causing bottlenecks on the network. The plflags command is used to display the tracing flags of /proc and status of pending and held signal. The plflags command also displays the /proc status information about all lightweight processes (LWP) in the target process. The pfiles command is used to check the file status and control information about all files open for the target process. Additionally, this command can report the path to the files of the target process. The pstack command prints the hexadecimal format stack trace information for each LWP included in the target process. When you run the /usr/bin/ps eflL command, you can identify that these commands are the cause of the problem if their status is ‘T’ by default.

Running the df command does not cause the process to stop responding. The df command displays the amount of free disk space on each mounted disk. This is generally 90 percent of the full capacity, and the remaining 10 percent is left for reporting statistics. The df command displays the amount of disk space occupied by currently mounted file systems, the amount of used and available space, and how much of the file system’s total capacity has been used.

Running the pmap command does not cause the process to stop responding. The pmap command displays the address space map for each process. You can use the pmap command to resolve problems regarding lack of disk space on the system. You can use the pmap command with different options to display information related to anonymous and swap reservations for shared mappings, unresolved dynamic linker map names, reserved addresses, HAT page size, swap reservations per mapping, and additional information per mapping. Additionally, you can use this command to forcefully grab the target process even if another process has control.

Reference:
Solaris 10 Reference Manual Collection, man pages section 1: User Commands, User Commands, proc(1) proc tools, http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/816-5165/6mbb0m9pd?a=view.

Solaris 10 Reference Manual Collection, man pages section 1: User Commands, User Commands, pmap(1) display information about the address space of a process, http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/816-5165/6mbb0m9oo?a=view.

Solaris 10 Reference Manual Collection, man pages section 1: User Commands, User Commands, df(1B) display status of disk space on file systems, http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/816-5165/6mbb0m9ee?a=view.

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