Question 2) Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure

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SubObjective: Plan a Strategy for Placing Global Catalog Servers
Multiple Answer Multiple Choice

 

You are a network administrator for your company. The company’s logical network design consists of a single Active Directory forest with 10 domains. All domain controllers run Windows Server 2003. All domains operate at the Windows 2000 native domain functional level.

 

Your company uses Windows Exchange 2000 for its messaging infrastructure. All network client computers run Windows XP Professional and have Outlook 2002 SP-1 installed.

 

You want to create a distribution group to use when sending e-mail messages. The messages will be distributed to users throughout the company’s single Exchange organization. You must configure the distribution account so that replication traffic is minimized when group membership changes are made.

 

What should you do? (Choose all that apply.)

 

A. Create a universal distribution group.
B. Create a global distribution group in each domain.
C. Nest each global distribution group in the universal distribution group.
D. Place the appropriate users from all domains in the universal distribution group.
E. Place the appropriate users from all domains in a single global distribution group.
F. Assign domain users to the global distribution group in the domain where the user account resides.

 

Answer:
A. Create a universal distribution group.
B. Create a global distribution group in each domain.
C. Nest each global distribution group in the universal distribution group.
F. Assign domain users to the global distribution group in the domain where the user account resides.

 

Tutorial:
You should use the following distribution group strategy:
Create a universal distribution group.
Create a global distribution group in each domain.
Assign domain users to the global distribution group in the domain where the user account resides.

 

Nest each global distribution group in the universal distribution group.

 

A domain operating at the Windows 2000 native domain functional level allows the creation of universal groups. In this mode, universal groups can contain user accounts, global groups, and universal groups from any domain in the forest. They are stored in the global catalog and are visible in any domain in the forest. However, domains operating at the Windows 2000 native domain functional level do not provide all of the domain- and forest-wide features that are available in the Windows Server 2003 forest functional level. In the Windows 2000 native domain functional level, membership changes in universal groups require the entire group (all members with their attributes) to be replicated to all global catalogs. To minimize the amount of data that is replicated (as well as reducing the size of Active Directory), you should place all user accounts in global groups created in the local domain. You should then nest the global groups in the universal group. Because global groups are stored in Active Directory on local domain controllers, membership changes made to the global groups will not be replicated across the forest. The universal groups will only show the global groups as members, and the full universal group membership (consisting of the global groups) will only be replicated when groups are added or removed from the universal group.

 

You should not place the appropriate users from all domains in a single global distribution group. You should use universal groups (which are stored in the global catalog) when creating distribution groups that will be used by Active Directory-aware applications (such as Exchange 2000 and Outlook 2002). Active Directory-aware applications access the global catalog for queries. Global groups can contain users and groups from all domains in the forest in Windows 2000 native mode, but using universal groups will improve performance of these applications.

 

You should not place the appropriate users from all domains in the universal distribution group. In the Windows 2000 native domain functional level, changes to universal group membership will require the full group to be replicated with each change and will produce excessive replication traffic.

 

In the Windows Server 2003 forest functional level, linked value replication is a new feature that allows individual values of a multivalued attribute (such as a group) to be replicated separately. Only the group member that has changed is replicated, and not the entire group. To enable linked value replication, you must raise the forest functional level to Windows Server 2003.

 

Reference:
1. Windows Server 2003 Help – Search
– New features for Active Directory

 

2. Windows Server 2003 Help – Search
– How replication works

 

3. Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure – Module 4: Implementing User, Group, and Computer Accounts
– What are Universal Groups

 

These questions are derived from the Self Test Software Practice Test for Microsoft Exam #70-294: Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure.

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