Question 2) Cert-XK0-002 – CompCert: Linux+

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Objective : Management
SubObjective : Modify file and directory permissions and ownership using CLI commands
Single Answer Multiple Choice

 

Which Linux system directory has the default drwxrwxrwt permission string?

 

 

  1. /usr
  2. /tmp
  3. /root
  4. /home

 

 

 

Answer:
B. /tmp

Tutorial:
The /tmp system directory has the default drwxrwxrwt permission string or the 1777 permission. All the users of the system can write to the /tmp directory. By enabling the sticky bit on the /tmp directory, you can ensure that only the file owners or system administrators are able to remove the files from the system. Sticky bit, which is a special permission applied on a directory, allows all the users to simultaneously add files to that directory and the file’s owner or an administrator to delete a file from the directory. A sticky bit is enabled on a directory when the directory’s permission string ends with the character, ‘t’. The sticky bit can be added to the permission string set of the other users by using the ‘chmod o+t /directoryname‘ command.

None of the /usr, /root, or /home directories have the default drwxrwxrwt permission string. The /usr directory and the /home directory have a default permission string of drwxr-xr-x or the 0755 permission; the /root directory has a default permission string of drwxr-x— or the 0750 permission.

 

Reference:
Linux.com, Basic Commands, http://howtos.linux.com/guides/abs-guide/basic.shtml.
Linux Online, Files and File System security, http://www.linux.org/docs/ldp/howto/Security-HOWTO/file-security.html.
Linux+ 2005 In Depth, Chapter 5: Linux Filesystem Management, Setting Special Permissions, pp. 190-193.

 

These questions are derived from the Transcender Practice Test for the CompTIA Linux+ certification exam.

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