Press Pass: Mr. Gates apologizes, must love Java and more

Certification Magazine Sept. 27

Welcome to the latest installment of Press Pass, where CertMag blows through as many industry press releases, blogs, dispatches, messages in a bottle, etc., as we can fit in one post. We’ve got the highlights and you can click thru straight to the horse’s mouth for more information.

Triple threat regret: Bill Gates has earned the right to say what he thinks. And what he thinks this week is that Ctrl+Alt+Del was a regrettable mishap forced — forced, I say — on Microsoft by a cantankerous keyboard designer (IBM’s David Bradley). He probably doesn’t mean precisely what you think he means: Gates was referring to the long-since retired necessity of hitting the world’s most ubiquitous keystroke combo to launch Windows. After all, even Bill Gates probably has to swear and reboot every once in a while. Gates’ remarks were made at a Harvard fund-raising event and can be viewed on YouTube.

One-track mind: Are you too focused on a single point in your certification future? In the latest installment of the Certifications for Success blog at Cisco Learning Network, blogger Danny Tomic addresses the value of being a little less singleminded in your pursuit of certification success. Tomic suggests a “tip of the spear” approach that spreads your focus across several tracks that eventually converge. Also, we’re pretty sure his blog avatar is from Planet of the Apes, so he’s probably a cool dude “IRL,” as they say.

Cream and sugar with that?: Attention, Java experts. Oracle wants you. Wants you to take a survey, that is. Oracle is preparing two new certification exams for its Java Enterprise Edition 7 (EE7) software and needs some front-line, in-the-trenches feedback. The future of Java certification could depend, at least in part, on what you have to say. And while we’re talking about surveys, please remember to take our Salary Survey, and tell your certified colleagues to take it, too.

478 days without a security breach: Workplace safety used to mean that people who worked on the line had to wear hard hats. More and more, however, it’s weak points in the company firewall that put everyone at risk. A new report from the annual security congress of (ISC)2 reveals that enterprise security is widely viewed at being one of the biggest challenges now faced by tech sector firms. Not only that, but apps and mobile devices are looked at as being two of the biggest threat vectors. Think about that the next time you’re tempted to whip out your dataphone to blitz a few levels of Angry Birds Star Wars between spreadsheets.

Don’t look now: The governance gurus at ISACA are also beating the drum for greater attention to enterprise security, noting that 2013 has been a “watershed” year for cyberattackers. Perhaps not surprisingly, ISACA recommends its own COBIT 5 framework as a security starting point. With everything from the flight of NSA leaker Edward Snowden to the successful exploitation of Mark Zuckerberg’s personal Facebook page exposing vulnerabilities, it certainly seems like an opportune moment to double down on protective measures.

A tip of the Red Hat: It may be Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs at the nation’s movie theaters this weekend (OK, technically it’s Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2), but the IT world knows that clouds, or at least the cloud, are/is part of every IT forecast. Tech firms are racing to stay abreast of this heavenward trend, and Red Hat announced earlier this week that its plans to deliver a comprehensive enterprise PaaS (platform-as-a-service) product are on track. Red Hat is expanding its OpenShift environment to make it easier for developers to “create, integrate and manage applications and business processes in the cloud.”

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Fida Reeder

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

FIDA REEDER is a journalist and writer with experience in both print and web publications. E-mail her at fidareeder (at) gmail (dot) com.

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