Planning Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Upgrade

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These questions are based on 70-238 – Pro: Deploying Messaging Solutions With Microsoft Exchange Server 2007.

 

Objective: Planning Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 Upgrades and Migrations
Sub-Objective: Plan coexistence with Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003 in a single organization

 

Single Answer, Multiple Choice

 

You are the messaging professional for GlobeComm Corporation. The messaging system in your organization has an Exchange 2007 server. A sister company has an Exchange 2003 messaging system. You plan to transition from Exchange 2003 to an Exchange 2007 messaging system for the sister company.

 

What should you do to prepare the organization for Exchange 2007 server deployment?

 

 

  1. Install the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 on the computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007 server.
  2. Modify the IP site link cost between the Active Directory sites.
  3. Modify the site link cost between the Active Directory sites with an Exchange Specific Cost.
  4. Upgrade all domain controllers in the organization to Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 (SP1).
  5. Install Exchange Management Console on the computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007 server.

 

Answer:
A. Install the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 on the computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007 server.

 

Tutorial:
The option stating that you should install the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 on the computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007 server is correct. Exchange 2007 can be installed only on a Windows Server 2003 computer. The Windows Server 2003 computer requires the following Windows components to run the Exchange 2007 server:

 

 

  • Microsoft .NET Framework Version 2.0.
  • Microsoft Windows PowerShell 1.0.
  • Microsoft Management Console (MMC) 3.0.
  • Windows PowerShell 1.0 is required to run the Exchange Management Shell and the MMC is required to run the Exchange Management Console. To install Windows PowerShell 1.0, you must install the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 on the computer that will run Windows PowerShell 1.0.

 

The option stating that you should modify the IP site link cost between the Active Directory sites is incorrect. An Active Directory IP site link cost determines the Exchange routing path between two or more Active Directory sites in an organization. A cost is assigned to an IP site link between two Active Directory sites based on the bandwidth and the network speed. When there are multiple Active Directory sites, you can configure an Active Directory site as a hub site. All messages are first routed to the hub site to be processed before the messages can be routed to the target servers. A hub site should exist along the least cost routing path to implement this routing behavior. You can use the Set-AdSiteLink cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell to assign an Exchange Specific Cost to an Active Directory IP site link for that purpose.

 

The option stating that you should modify the site link cost between the Active Directory sites with an Exchange Specific Cost is incorrect. An Exchange Specific Cost can be used to configure an IP Site link with a cost that is used only by Microsoft Exchange and not by Active Directory. If you want Exchange traffic to take a replication path other than Active Directory on IP Site links, you can assign an Exchange Specific Cost to the site link. The Exchange Specific Cost is an attribute used to determine the Exchange routing path when the Active Directory-assigned cost does not result in an optimal Exchange message routing topology. You can use the Set-AdSiteLink cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell to assign a site link attribute named msExchCost, with a different site link cost than what Active Directory uses.

 

The option stating that you should upgrade all domain controllers in the organization to Windows Server 2003 SP1 is incorrect. Domain controllers in an Exchange 2007 organization must be at Windows 2000 or 2003 functional levels. Only the domain controllers that are the schema master and the Global Catalog Server should run Windows Server 2003 SP1 or R2 editions.

 

The option stating that you should install the Exchange Management Console on the computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007 is incorrect. The Exchange Management Console is installed during Exchange 2007 installation. The Exchange Management Console is a graphical user interface which allows you to install, uninstall or modify the server roles installation on an Exchange 2007 server. In this scenario, you should install Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 on a computer where you plan to install Exchange 2007.

 

Reference:
Microsoft TechNet > Exchange 2007 System Requirements

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