Plan Network and Application Services

These questions are based on 70-647: PRO: Windows Server 2008, Enterprise Administrator
Microsoft
Self Test Software Practice Test


Objective: Plan network and application services.
Sub-objective: Plan for name resolution and IP addressing.


Multiple-answer, multiple-choice


You are the network administrator of your company. The company has a main office and three branch offices. The company’s network consists of a single Active Directory domain. You are required to recommend a DHCP addressing solution for all offices. Your recommendation must ensure all clients in the network can automatically obtain IP addresses in the event that a single DHCP server fails, even if the failure occurs after business hours. You must also minimize network traffic between the four offices.


What two methods can you recommend? (Choose two. Each correct answer represents a complete solution.)



  1. Configure a DHCP relay agent in each office.
  2. Configure a split scope.
  3. Configure a standby DHCP server in each office.
  4. Configure a DHCP Server service on a failover cluster.

Answer:
B. Configure a split scope
D. Configure a DHCP Server service on a failover cluster


Tutorial:
You should recommend configuring a split scope or configuring DHCP Servers on a failover cluster. The DHCP Server service in Windows Server 2008 is a cluster-aware application; using clustering support for DHCP is a local method of implementing DHCP server failover to achieve greater fault tolerance. Installing a DHCP instance on a failover cluster is useful when DHCP relay is not supported on your network and when you want to minimize traffic on the network that would result in allowing DHCP servers in different offices to provide backup to each other.


Configuring a split scope is another way of implementing DHCP remote failover. To use split scopes for implementing DHCP remote failover, you should deploy two DHCP servers in the same network that share a split-scope configuration based on the 80/20 rule. With a split-scope configuration, if one server becomes unavailable, the other server can take its place and continue to lease new IP addresses or renew existing clients. Configuring split DHCP scopes also is helpful when you want to balance server loads between multiple DHCP servers.


You should not configure a DHCP relay agent in each office. The DHCP relay agent is a routing protocol component based on the older Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) relay agent that is responsible for relaying DHCP messages between DHCP clients and servers located on different IP networks. DHCP relay agent cannot be used to provide fault tolerance. Also, when you configure a DHCP relay agent, clients have to contact DHCP servers located on a different subnet to obtain an IP address, increasing traffic between those networks.


You should not configure a standby DHCP server in each office. A standby DHCP server and its scopes are not activated for use automatically. The DHCP server and its scopes are activated by the administrator only when required, such as when a DHCP server fails or is taken offline for an extended period of time. Standby servers require manual administration to ensure failover transition and therefore might not be as effective as other failover methods, such as split scopes and clustered servers.


Reference:
Windows Server 2003 Technical Library > Windows Server 2003: Product Help > Windows Server 2003 Product Help > Network Services > Managing Core Network Services > DHCP > DHCP Concepts > Administering DHCP > Windows Server TechCenter > Managing DHCP Servers > Cluster support for DHCP servers


Windows Server TechCenter > Windows Server 2003 Technical Library > Windows Server 2003: Deployment > Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide > Deploying Network Services > Deploying DHCP > Creating Your DHCP Server Design > Optimizing DHCP Availability > Using Clustered DHCP Servers


Windows Server TechCenter > Windows Server 2003 Technical Library > Windows Server 2003: Deployment > Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide > Deploying Network Services > Deploying DHCP > Creating Your DHCP Server Design > Optimizing DHCP Availability > Using Split-Scope Configurations

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