Troubleshooting Exchange Server Computers

These questions are derived from the Self Test Software Practice Test for Microsoft exam #70-284 – Implementing and Managing Microsoft Exchange Server 2003

Objective: Managing, Monitoring, and Troubleshooting Exchange Server Computers
SubObjective: Manage, monitor, and troubleshoot data storage

Single Answer, Multiple Choice

You administer an Exchange 2003 server. The operating system and program files reside on drive C, which is located on a single 4-GB physical disk. The paging file resides on drive D, which is located on a 5-GB RAID-0 device. The transaction logs are hosted on drive E, which are located on an 8-GB RAID-1 device.

Employees in your company access thousands of large documents in several public folders in a public store. You created the public store on drive F on a 50-GB RAID-10 device; the store currently requires 45 GB.

Users complain that it takes too much time to perform searches in the public folders. You decide to create a full-text index.

On which disks should you place the full-text index?

  1. on drive C
  2. on drive D
  3. on drive E
  4. on drive F
  5. on a new RAID device

Answer:
E. on a new RAID device

Tutorial:
Because the public store in this scenario contains thousands of large documents, the full-text index on the store is likely to be quite large. To provide the best performance, it is recommended that each of the following components be placed on a separate physical disk or RAID device: the operating system and program files, the paging file, each Exchange store, each set of transaction logs, each full-text index and a full-text temporary directory. Typically, a full-text index on a store should require disk space that equals approximately 20 to 25 percent of the amount of data in the store. The full-text index on the 45-GB public store in this scenario will probably require about 10 GB of disk space. None of the existing drives in this scenario has enough free space to accommodate the index. Among the presented choices, you should place the full-text index on a new dedicated RAID device. You may choose to configure the new RAID device as RAID-0; its read performance is comparable to that of a RAID-1 or RAID-5 device, and its write performance is faster. Although a RAID-0 device does not provide fault tolerance, you can rebuild the index in the event of its failure.

If confronted with a choice of placing either the transaction logs or the index files on the same drive as the database files, the choice depends on where your concern lies. If the concern is to improve search times at the slight expense of the performance of the normal mailbox and public folder access, place the transaction logs on the same drive as the database. If you are more concerned with normal mailbox and public folder performance at the expense of index searches, place the index files on the same drive as the database.

Note that you cannot change the location of a full-text index after it has been created; you can specify a path for a full-text index only when you are creating the index. In order to move an existing full-text index, you must delete the index, and then create a new one. If the amount of free disk space were not a consideration in this scenario and you were not allowed to install an additional hard disk or RAID device, then placing the full-text index on drive F would probably have the least impact on the server’s performance.

Reference:
1. Exchange Server 2003 Administration Guide – Appendix F – Using Full-Text Indexing
– Verifying Recommended Hardware Configurations, p. 423.

2. Exchange Server 2003 Administration Guide – Appendix F – Using Full-Text Indexing
– Preparing Your Exchange 2003 Organization, p. 224.

3. Exchange Server 2003 Administration Guide – Appendix F – Using Full-Text Indexing
– Deploying Full-Text Indexing, pp. 424-436.

4. Exchange Server 2003 Administration Guide – Appendix F – Using Full-Text Indexing
– Managing Full-Text Indexing, pp. 436-437.

Like what you see? Share it.Share on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
cmadmin

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Posted in Archive|

Comment: