Manage and Maintain Physical and Logical Devices

These questions are based on 70-290 – Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment
Microsoft
Self Test Software Practice Test


Objective: Manage and maintain physical and logical devices.
Sub-objective: Troubleshoot server hardware devices.


Single answer, multiple-choice


You are a network administrator for your company. A Windows Server 2003 computer named SQL1 runs SQL Server 2000 and hosts a database with customer data. All hard disks on SQL1 are dynamic disks. Database files are located on a RAID-5 volume, and transaction logs are located on a mirrored volume. Employees access the database through a custom client application.


SQL1 experiences a catastrophic hardware failure. After analyzing the nature of the failure, you discover that repairing the failed computer would not be cost-efficient. The hard disks have not been damaged, and no data loss has occurred. You have a spare computer, and you decide to use it instead of the failed computer. You install Windows Server 2003 and SQL Server 2000 on the new computer, and then you move the disks that host the RAID-5 volume with the customer database files and the disks that host the mirrored volume with the transaction log files to the new computer. You must ensure that users can access the customer database without making any changes to the client application.


What should you do next?



  1. Reactivate the disks.
  2. Repair the disks.
  3. Import the foreign disks.
  4. Initialize the disks.

Answer:
C. Import the foreign disks.


Tutorial:
To ensure users can access the customer database without making any changes to the configuration of the client application, you should assign the new computer the same name as that of the failed computer. When dynamic disks are moved between computers, the volumes on those disks usually retain their original drive letters. However, the disks that have been moved from the failed computer in this scenario have a different signature than the existing disks on the new computer. Therefore, the moved disks will be marked as foreign disks, and the volumes on those disks will not be accessible. To make the volumes with the database and transaction log files accessible on the new computer, you should import the foreign disks. Note that all of the disks that constitute a multi-disk volume should be moved between computers and imported at the same time. Otherwise, the volume will not function properly.


You would need to reactivate an existing disk if the disk became temporarily unavailable due to a transient hardware problem or data corruption. Disks cannot be repaired; only RAID-5 volumes can. For example, if one of the disks in a RAID-5 volume failed and there was sufficient unallocated space on another disk, then you could repair the volume by replacing the RAID-5 region on the failed disk with another region, which would be automatically created in the unallocated space. When a new disk is added to a computer, it is necessary to initialize it before you can start using the new disk. Initializing involves writing a master boot record and a signature on the new disk. In this scenario, the disks that host the customer database are not new; they already contain a signature.


Reference:
Windows Server 2003 Online Help, Contents, “Disks and Data,” “Managing Disks and Volumes,” “Disk Management,” “Concepts,” “Understanding Disk Management,” “The Disk Management Window.”


Windows Server 2003 Online Help, Contents, “Disks and Data,” “Managing Disks and Volumes,” “Disk Management,” “How To…,” “Manage Disks,” “Move disks to another computer.”


Windows Server 2003 Online Help, Contents, “Disks and Data,” “Managing Disks and Volumes,” “Disk Management,” “Troubleshooting.”

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