IBM Releases New Certs

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IBM Introduces New WebSphere Certifications

 

 

IBM recently introduced four new certifications for IBM WebSphere, a
WebSphere-based IBM Certified Solution Developer credential, two
WebSphere-based IBM Certified Specialist certifications and an IBM
Certified Enterprise Developer based on WebSphere. All four new
certifications are part of the IBM Certified for e-Business Solution
Technologist role and the Solution Developer and Enterprise Developer
certifications also line up with the jCert Initiative.

 

 

The IBM Certified Solution Developer – IBM WebSphere Studio Application
Developer for Windows, v4.0.3 credential tests candidates ability to
design, implement, debug, profile and deploy Java 2 Platform, Enterprise
Edition (J2EE) Web applications and Java applications. These
applications could include Servlets, JavaServerPages (JSPs) and HTML and
typically use JavaBeans and Java Database Connectivity (JDBC)
technology. This certification requires three exams: #155, Sun Certified
Programmer for the Java 2 Platform; #486, Object-Oriented Analysis and
Design with UML; and #157, IBM WebSphere Studio Application Developer
for Windows, v4.0.3.

 

 

The IBM Certified Enterprise Developer – IBM WebSphere Application
Server, Advanced Single Server Edition for Multiplatforms v4.0,
WebSphere Based credential is meant for candidates who design, create
and maintain J2EE components, including Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs) and
JSPs, as well as deploying and configuring these components and
supporting the development of application clients that access them.
Candidates must first achieve the IBM Certified Solution Developer – IBM
WebSphere Studio Application Developer for Windows, v4.0.3 credential.
Then, to earn the Certified Enterprise Developer, they must pass two
exams: #483, Enterprise Connectivity (with J2EE), and #158, IBM
WebSphere Application Server, Advanced Single Server Edition for
Multiplatforms, v4.0, WebSphere Based. 

 

 

The IBM Certified Specialist – IBM WebSphere Studio Application
Developer for Windows v4.0.3 requires exam, #157, and the IBM Certified
Specialist – IBM WebSphere Application Server, Advanced Single Server
Edition for Multiplatforms, v4.0, WebSphere Based also requires a single
exam, #158. Both of these certifications are designed to provide
technical sales support.

 

 

For more information, go to http://www.ibm.com/certify and look in the
WebSphere category.

 

Happy Birthday to You…

 

 

I always miss birthdays, and I just missed another one, actually two.
Both Microsoft and CompTIA celebrated birthdays this year. CompTIA
reached its 20th year in March, and the Microsoft Certified Professional
(MCP) program reached its 10th in April. So let’s take this chance to
take a look at the two and see how far they’ve come.

 

 

CompTIA, the Computing Technology Industry Association, was founded in
1982 as the Association of Better Computer Dealers, with a membership of
four founding companies. CompTIA now has 10,000 corporate and 10,500
individual professional members. The association delivers well-known
certification exams, like A+, Network+ and Server+, and almost half a
million people have earned CompTIA certifications. However, CompTIA is
more than a certification vendor.

 

 

CompTIA represents the computing and communications market, providing
standards in areas such as Internet-enabled service provision, e-
commerce, public policy, workforce development and training, in addition
to offering vendor-neutral technical certifications. CompTIA members
include the originial reseller and solution providers in addition to IT
training companies, xSPs, nonprofit educational and government
institutions, telecoms and individual professionals. For more about
CompTIA, see
http://www.comptia.org.

 

 

Microsoft initiated the MCP program in 1992, and has since certified
more than 1.2 million people throughout the world with credentials
ranging from the MCP itself to the more advanced Microsoft Certified
Systems Engineer (MCSE).

 

 

Brian Bosserman was one of the first 10 MCSEs in the world. He has been
in the IT industry 16 years and is currently a senior consultant with
Business Systems International in Seattle. So, how has being one of the
first MCSE-certified professionals helped Bosserman?

 

 

“It just opened up a lot of doors,” he said. “Without having a
credential as a small-business person, it’s really tough to get jobs
with large clients. It’s kind of like when you’re trying to get a door
to open, you need to have something unique about yourself—you need to
have somebody backing you, and the Microsoft certification process lets
you use the Microsoft name to get opportunities you otherwise wouldn’t
get. Microsoft wasn’t the first to have certification, but it’s
definitely the most successful, and that’s helped a lot of people out.”

 

 

To find out more about Microsoft’s 10th anniversary, check out
Certification Magazine’s Interview with Anne Marie McSweeney, director
of the MCP program, at
http://www.certmag.com/issues/jun02/dept_interview.cfm.   

 

 

RHI Consulting: Moderate Hiring Improvement in Third Quarter

 

 

According to RHI Consulting’s “Information Technology Hiring Index,”
CIOs expect a net 13 percent increase in hiring for IT professionals in
the third quarter of 2002—16 percent of those surveyed plan to add IT
staff, while 3 percent forecasted cutbacks. This is up from the second
quarter’s forecast, which predicted a net 10 percent increase in hiring
activity. For the fourth quarter, 80 percent of executives surveyed said
they expect no change in hiring activity at their firms.

 

 

The poll was developed by RHI Consulting (http://www.rhic.com<FO
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