Garter’s people3 Finds Increase in IT Salaries

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From 2002 to 2003, IT jobs saw a 2.9 increase in average base salary, according to a survey released by people3, a division of research firm Gartner Inc. In addition, people3 found that in the same time period there was a 4.2 percent increase in median base salary for IT jobs surveyed. This information was based on data reported by the companies that participated in the survey both years.

 

 

 

People3’s “2003 IT Market Compensation Study” is based on survey data submitted by 151 organizations in March 2003. It represents compensation data for nearly 44,000 IT employees in the United States. The study is published annually.

 

 

 

According to the study, IT organizations reported having the greatest difficulty recruiting people with various enterprise resource planning (ERP) skills. The most difficult skill to recruit, according to survey respondents, was Oracle administration. PeopleSoft and UNIX tied for second.

 

 

 

The study also looked at the IT positions that survey respondents found most difficult to fill. IT organizations reported they had the hardest time filling database administrator, Internet/Web architect, network architect, network engineer and security analyst positions.

 

 

 

Survey respondents reported that the most effective way to improve IT staff members’ performance was offering short-term incentives and bonus programs that are based on performance of the business unit. Just over 39 percent of respondents said they used short-term incentives to improve performance, compared to almost 31 percent in 2002.

 

 

 

For more information on the “2003 IT Market Compensation Study,” see http://www.gartner.com/itcompstudy. 

 


Emily Hollis is associate editor for Certification Magazine. She can be reached at ehollis@certmag.com. 

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