Configuring and Troubleshooting Networking

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Questions derived from the 70-622 – PRO: Microsoft Desktop Support – ENTERPRISE Microsoft Self-Test Software Practice Test.

 

Objective: Configuring and Troubleshooting Networking
SubObjective: Troubleshoot connectivity issues

 

Item Number: 70-622.4.4.9
Single Answer, Multiple Choice

 

You are the desktop support technician of your company. You install Windows Vista on all client computers on the network and enable User Account Control (UAC). All users use standard user accounts to log on to their computers.

 

A user reports that he is experiencing problems accessing network resources. You suspect a problem with the TCP/IP settings on the user’s computer. You instruct the user to run the Ipconfig /release command. The user reports that he receives an error message when he attempts to run the Ipconfig /release command from a command prompt.

 

What should you do to ensure that the user is able to release and renew IP address without receiving any error message?

 

 

  1. Instruct the user to select the Run this program as an administrator option on the Compatibility tab in the Command Prompt Properties dialog box.
  2. Instruct the user to right-click the command prompt application and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Instruct the user to right-click the command prompt application and select the Run as option.
  4. Add the user to the Power Users group.

 

Answer:
B. Instruct the user to right-click the command prompt application and select the Run as administrator option.

 

Tutorial:
You should instruct the user to right-click the command prompt application and select the Run as administrator option.

 

Windows Vista supports two levels of users, namely standard users and administrators. The standard user and administrator user accounts specify the level of access the user has over core, protected areas of a computer running Windows Vista. Even a user with administrative privileges is logged on to a Windows Vista computer as a standard user. User Account Control (UAC) is a new security component in Windows Vista that helps mitigate the impact of malware. UAC limits administrator-level access to authorized processes by requiring all users to run applications and tasks with a standard user account. The standard users are members of the Users group and cannot install any applications or make system changes. When a standard user attempts to run utilities such as IPConfig, he receives an access denied message stating that this task requires elevation. To enable a standard user to run command-line utilities that will enable him to make system changes, you should instruct the user to open the Administrator: Command Prompt. You can open an Administrator: Command Prompt by right-clicking the command prompt application, selecting the Run as administrator option and providing administrative credentials. By using an Administrator: Command Prompt, a user can run command-line utilities such as IPConfig to release and renew the IP address of the system. The Ipconfig command allows you to configure and troubleshoot TCP/IP settings. For example, when a user is unable access resources after you make configuration changes to the DHCP server, you can run the Ipconfig /release command, followed by the Ipconfig /renew command to receive the updated configuration from the DHCP server.

 

You should not instruct the user to select the Run this program as an administrator option on the Compatibility tab in the Command Prompt Properties dialog box. All the options on the Compatibility tab of any application that is part of Windows operating system are disabled by default. Therefore, the user cannot select the Run this program as an administrator option.

 

You should not instruct the user to right-click the command prompt application and select the Run as option. The Run as option is not available in Windows Vista. The Run as option has been replaced by the Run as administrator option in Windows Vista.

 

You should not add the user to the Power Users group. The Power Users group primarily provides backward compatibility for running non-certified applications or legacy applications. The members of the Power Users group can modify computer-wide settings with some restrictions. The Power Users group in Windows Vista has been removed.

 

Reference:
TechNet Home > Windows Vista Home > Technical Library > Security and Protection > User Account Control > Understanding and Configuring User Account Control in Windows Vista

 

TechNet Home > TechNet Magazine > November 2006 > Windows Vista > Achieve the Non-Admin Dream with User Account Control

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