Configure Network Infrastructure for Windows SharePoint Services

These questions are based on 70-631 TS: Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, Configuring Microsoft Self Test Software Practice Test.


Objective: Configure Network Infrastructure for Windows SharePoint Services
Sub-objective: Configuring Network Load Balancing (NLB)


Multiple answer, multiple choice


You have deployed Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS 3.0) on four servers in your organization. Each server contains one network adapter. To ensure network traffic for WSS servers is equally load balanced among all the WSS servers, you configure a Network Load Balancing (NLB) cluster in the default operating mode.


On the WSS server FrontServer1, you attempt to configure and manage other hosts in the NLB cluster using Network Load Balancing Manager. You are unable to launch the Network Load Balancing Manager. Which two actions could you perform to configure Network Load Balancing Manager on FrontServer1? (Choose two. Each answer is an alternate solution to the problem.)



  1. Install a second network adapter on FrontServer1.
  2. Configure the NLB cluster to use multicast mode.
  3. Install a second network adapter on all of the WSS servers in the NLB cluster.
  4. Ensure the cluster IP address is listed before the dedicated IP address on FrontServer1.

Answer:
B. Configure the NLB cluster to use multicast mode.
C. Install a second network adapter on all of the WSS servers in the NLB cluster.


Tutorial:
You can configure the NLB cluster to use multicast mode or install a second network adapter on all of the WSS servers in the NLB cluster. When you are working from a computer with a single network adapter that is bound to NLB in unicast mode, you cannot use Network Load Balancing Manager to configure and manage other hosts.


An NLB cluster can be configured to operate in unicast mode or multicast mode. The unicast mode can be used only when your server has multiple NICs, whereas multicast mode will be used when there is only one NIC. If the NLB cluster is configured to operate in unicast mode, any communication among cluster hosts is not possible unless each cluster host has at least two network adapters. Multicast mode support is not enabled by default. When an NLB cluster is configured in multicast mode, the cluster’s Media Access Control (MAC) address is assigned to network adapters that are functioning as cluster adapters, but the cluster adapter’s built-in address is retained so that both addresses are used. The first MAC address is used for client-to-cluster traffic, and the second address is used for network traffic specific to the computer. If the NLB cluster is configured in unicast mode, intra-host communication between peers of the same cluster is not possible because all hosts share the same NLB MAC address.


When you have more than one network adapter installed in all hosts in the NLB cluster, you can configure a dedicated adapter for intrahost communication. When you add a new server in the NLB cluster that has a dedicated adapter for intrahost communication, you should configure the new server to use unicast mode for intrahost communication to ensure you do not receive an IP address conflict error.


You should not install a second network adapter on FrontServer1. To ensure that intrahost communication is supported between all hosts in the NLB cluster, you should have two network adapters on all hosts in the NLB cluster or configure the NLB cluster to use multicast mode.


You should not ensure that the cluster IP address is listed before the dedicated IP address on FrontServer1. The dedicated IP address must always be entered before the cluster IP address to ensure that all outbound connections made from the host are initiated with this address.


Reference:
Windows Server TechCenter > Windows Server 2003 Technical Library > Windows Server 2003: Product Help > Windows Server 2003 Product Help > Availability and Scalability > Windows Clustering > Network Load Balancing Clusters > Network Load Balancing Concepts > Using Network Load Balancing > Single network adapter limitations

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